Tamworth Regional Astronomy Club: Why should we be interested in stars?

​WELCOME to the first monthly column on the night skies of the North West.

The aim of the column is to provide a general guide for anyone who has ever looked up at the stars and wondered what they are.  Each month our club members will provide some tips and advice for those interested in learning more about astronomy, details of any current sky events as well as information about forthcoming activities hosted by the club and how you can participate. 

People often ask “why should I be interested in astronomy?”  The answer lies in the fact we are a small part of the universe and that astronomy is the oldest science.  Humans have always looked up at the night sky with wonder and curiosity.  

When we look at the universe we are examining our environment and our place in it on the largest possible scale and it. Astronomy is one of the few sciences in which backyard observers can still make important contributions.  

Brought to you by the Tamworth Regional Astronomy Club.

Star chart:  The sky looking south from the New England/North West Region around 8pm in mid-June.  Image courtesy of SkySafari, skysafariastronomy.com

Star chart: The sky looking south from the New England/North West Region around 8pm in mid-June. Image courtesy of SkySafari, skysafariastronomy.com

Colour codes: De-focussed star trails showing the colours of the stars in the Southern Cross region. Photo by Leigh Tschirpig.

Colour codes: De-focussed star trails showing the colours of the stars in the Southern Cross region. Photo by Leigh Tschirpig.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop