Deputy Commissioner for Regional NSW Gary Worboys points to PCYC, youth program to tackle ice

Taking charge: New Deputy Police Commissioner for Regional NSW Gary Worboys, pictured in Tamworth. Photo: Peter Hardin
Taking charge: New Deputy Police Commissioner for Regional NSW Gary Worboys, pictured in Tamworth. Photo: Peter Hardin

A BOLD plan to start a boxing program in Armidale to engage troubled teenagers could have the backing of the bush’s new top cop.

The new Deputy Commissioner for Regional NSW Gary Worboys headed to the New England region just hours after the announcement of his appointment.

Deputy Commissioner Worboys said police would need to work with other agencies to combat the ice epidemic in country areas.

New England police are pushing to establish a youth-orientated program centred around morning boxing sessions with mentors that will have far-wider influences for local teenagers, and hopefully turn them away from a life of crime.

Already I've said police are doing a fantastic job, what we need to do in terms of the ice and the drug issues is to not only look at the mid-level suppliers but also attack it from a different angle and look at some educational programs with our PCYC and our youth officers and other agencies aswell.

Deputy Commissioner for Regional NSW Gary Worboys

“Already I've said police are doing a fantastic job, what we need to do in terms of the ice and the drug issues is to not only look at the mid-level suppliers but also attack it from a different angle and look at some educational programs with our PCYC and our youth officers and other agencies aswell,” Deputy Commissioner Worboys said.

New England police are searching for a group of mentors to hopefully kickstart the program in July out of the Armidale PCYC.

It will involve an hour of boxing, a breakfast club, then classes to boost education and learn life skills before school.

The catalyst for action came after one-on-one talks with a string of teenagers who have been arrested in Armidale for crimes such as property offences, robberies and assaults.

Several community groups have been approached to participate, but the initiative will need the backing of business to get off the ground.