Restoration needed in wake of change

The passing of new native vegetation laws by NSW Parliament has reinforced the need for a concerted, collaborative effort on ecological restoration, ecologist Professor David Lindenmayer says.

A headline speaker at the University of New England’s Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate conference in early 2017, Professor Lindenmayer said farms with high levels of biodiversity and good ecological function are actually more profitable and sustainable over the long term.

TIMELY CONFERENCE: University of New England’s Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate conference will be held in February next year.

TIMELY CONFERENCE: University of New England’s Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate conference will be held in February next year.

RESEARCHER: Professor David Lindenmayer will be a headline speaker at the University of New England’s Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate conference.

RESEARCHER: Professor David Lindenmayer will be a headline speaker at the University of New England’s Restore, Regenerate, Revegetate conference.

“This new Act underscores the importance for farmers, scientists and others working on land management to get together and share their experiences.”

A researcher at Australian National University’s Fenner School, Prof. Lindenmayer will join other scientists and some of Australia’s most progressive land managers in Armidale in February to discuss the knowledge gained over several decades of ecological restoration work on farms, mines and elsewhere around Australia.

“Early bird” discount registrations close on December 7.

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